Stretch of the Week: Prone Double Internal Rotation Stretch

by Rachel Lackowski | Leave a Comment

Continuing with the theme of internal rotation of the hip, for week two we will review a stretch while lying face down.

This is the Prone Double Internal Rotation stretch.

You will need some wall space for this week’s stretch. If you have trouble coming all the way to the floor you can perform this on the bed as well. As with last week’s exercise, you should not perform this stretch if you have or are currently experiencing the following: hip injuries, hip replacements, hip impingement, or pain when rotating the hip or knee inward. As with beginning any exercise program, it is recommended that you contact your physician, physical or occupational therapist to determine what is best for you.

Starting Position:

  1. Start by lying face down with both knees towards the wall. The knees are bent, keeping a little space between the knees and the wall. The toes will come to the wall and curled under. Knees are hip distance apart. Place your hands under your face. The starting position is shown in the top photo.

prone double internal rotation stretch

Performing the Prone Double Internal Rotation Stretch:

  1. First, move only one leg at a time. Starting with the right leg, walk the foot down the wall slowly to the right, keeping the toes and feet flexed the entire time. Think of the foot moving in an arc. Keep the knee and the thigh on the floor, rotating just from the hip. You may feel the tendency of the left hip to lift off the floor as the right leg moves away from the body. So concentrate on keeping it to the floor by keeping your abdominal muscles engaged throughout the movement. This will also help keep your back from twisting. Only go as far as your hip flexibility will allow and without pain. The second photo demonstrates the one leg movement.
  1. Hold for 5 breaths. Gently bring the leg back to center. Repeat on the other side.
  1. Now that you have completed each leg, let’s do them together. The same movements and muscle engagements as indicated above still apply, but now you are just doing both legs at the same time. Try to keep the legs even as they move away from the body so that the motion is completed at approximately the same time. Sometimes it’s hard to tell where your legs are at when you are unable to see them. This is a great opportunity to get a friend or family member to tell you if they are! Remain here for 8 breaths. This is shown in the bottom photo.

Thanks again for tuning into the weekly stretch!

Questions? Email me at rachel.lackowski@athletico.com

The Athletico blog is an educational resource written by Athletico employees. Athletico bloggers are licensed professionals who abide by the code of ethics outlined by their respective professional associations. The content published in blog posts represents the opinion of the individual author based on their expertise and experience. The content provided in this blog is for informational purposes only, does not constitute medical advice and should not be relied on for making personal health decisions.

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