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Beating the Heat in Athletics

Posted on by Michelle Helberg

Every year heat illness affects thousands of people. Knowing the different types of heat illnesses and what to do to both prevent and treat them is imperative to the health and safety of yourself or your child. With the start of school, fall sports such as football are ready to hit the ground running. But are you prepared to beat the heat? Read More

Taking Training Too Far: A Quick Look at Rhabdomyolysis

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

First off, thanks for making it past the title and not assuming that rhabdomyolysis wasn’t some word I made up to sound like a medical genius. Rhabdomyolysis, or rhabdo in fitness slang, is a rare, but very dangerous condition seen in athletes that are pushing themselves too far. Fitness competitions are becoming a rapidly growing phenomenon, which means more and more people testing their body’s limits, so I figured it was time to raise some awareness about this condition and how to avoid it. Read More

The Bump on Your Shin: What It Is and What to Do

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

As an athletic trainer that works with young, active populations, I get a lot of questions about injuries– some more common than others. One of the more common questions I get– especially adolescents – is “What is this bump below my knee?” The answer is almost always Osgood-Schlatter disease – a condition that sounds like the end of the world, but isn’t anything to lose sleep over. Read More

America’s Growing Epidemic: Text Neck

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

Take a look at any group of people and you will, without fail, see a few of them with their cell phones out, heads lowered, and shoulders rolled forward – temporarily hunchbacked because of an incoming text. Any physical therapist, athletic trainer, or physician can tell you that that type of posture (text neck) can lead to a wide range of injuries in the neck, back, shoulders, and arms. Now I’m not advocating abandoning texting and moving to a Bluetooth headset-only society/dystopia. I’m also not saying we should eschew cell phones like a grizzled hermit, angrily shaking our fists at anything that plugs in. I just want you to be aware of what you’re predisposing yourself to and what you can do to help counteract the effects of text-neck. So here are a couple of key things to think about the next time you pull out your cell phone. Read More

Preventing Recurrent Ankle Sprains

Posted on by Liz Hoobchaak

When I treat a patient after an ankle sprain, I am never surprised to find out that this may not be the first time they sprained their ankle. I often have younger athletes in the clinic after their second or third ankle sprain and find out that they never had any formal treatment after the first one. So why are recurring ankle sprains so common and how can we prevent them? Read More

10 Places You Didn’t Know Utilized Athletic Trainers

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

March is National Athletic Training Month and athletic training has evolved as more and more people find out that athletic trainers’ expertise has applications far beyond athletics. Sure, working with on the field (or court – it is time for March Madness) may be the backbone of our profession, but there is an ever-expanding list of non-traditional settings that athletic trainers are making an impact. Below are 10 settings you might not have realized utilized athletic trainers. Read More

It’s All in the Hips: Part 3

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

So here we are, three entries deep into the “It’s All in the Hips” saga. We’ve covered gluteus medius and its role in stability. We’ve also talked about the gluteus maximus and its importance in power production. Today, we’ll take a journey to the front of the hips to talk about the hip flexors. Read More

It’s All in the Hips: Part 2

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

In my last post, I made the case for 2 muscles in your hips being integral for optimal health and performance. The first post focused on the gluteus medius, but now it’s time to take a look at the gluteus maximus. Our 2 gluteus maximus muscles (glutes for short) make up a majority of our rear and are probably the most famous muscles in the body. It has been focused on in the famous “Buns of Steel” workout and has inspired more than its fair share of songs. The glutes’ main action is extending our legs backwards, which is incredibly useful for anything from walking and standing up to sprinting and lifting. The problem is that since most of us spend a majority of the day sitting, our glutes are rarely used and are often weak. Read More

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