Tag Archive: fitness

Knee Pain- When to Seek a Professional

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With fall sports underway, injuries are prone to happen.  With the cutting, twisting and tackling movements that occur in sports, such as football and soccer, Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries can occur. (more…)

Deep Sea Fishing: 7 Tips for Prevention of Low Back Pain

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Fish on! Hook up! Fresh one! These are all common phrases to yell out when your reel is screaming and the line is taken hundreds of feet into the ocean. It is also in that moment that you may realize your back is in for a workout. (more…)

Combating Childhood Obesity

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Childhood obesity is a rising epidemic and a valid concern for many parents.  With the surge in all things electronic from televisions, computers, video games, and hand held devices, we have populations of children being sedentary rather than up, moving, playing, and active.   As the economy puts stress on single, as well as two-parent, households the trend in meals has been on things fast, easy, and affordable which unfortunately does not often equate to healthy or nutrient dense.  Here are some eye opening facts on childhood obesity taken directly from an article by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (more…)

One Sport Specialization May Increase Your Risk of a Knee Injury

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In my last post on ACL injuries, I posted that overtraining can predispose someone to an ACL injury. Overtraining (spending too much time training without proper recovery) can have some serious health consequences. Overtraining is becoming an increasingly common problem as athletes are starting to specialize in one sport at younger ages. Discussing solutions to overtraining and specialization is always tough since it usually involves telling someone to play less of the sport they want to excel at. Having said that, research and anecdotal evidence both make a strong case for how varying up the sports you play through the year can lead to a healthier and more successful athletic career. (more…)

Want to Become a Better Runner in the New Year?

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To answer that question: Sure, I think all of us would like to become a better runner next year. But how many of us actually will? Approximately 40-45% of Americans make New Year’s Resolutions but of those, how many can be 100% committed to that resolution throughout the entire year?

As physical therapists, when setting goals for our patients, we use the “SMART” principle. The essentials of goal setting are very similar to that of New Year’s resolutions and it will make it easier for you to end next year with success. (more…)

Benefits of Getting a Functional Movement Screen™ in 2014

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As a new year begins, have you begun to revise your personal goals or New Year’s resolutions for 2014? A top choice for many people usually includes something to do with exercise, health, fitness, or sports. As a physical therapist, I am fully on board when individuals, friends, families, players, coworkers, or teams want to get up and get moving. However, before you start that ramped up exercise program, fitness routine, physically demanding occupation, or competitive sport, make sure your movement is up to par for your activity. I’m sure “going to physical therapy” is not on your short list of 2014 goals.  An excellent way to accomplish this is to get yourself, your workplace, or your team a Functional Movement Screen™. (more…)

A Twist on Fall Fitness: Helpful Resources for Some Family Friendly Fun

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Fall is one of my favorite seasons as I love the vibrant colors and the more comfortable temperatures. It is also a great time to be active so below are some family friendly activities to consider taking part in this fall. If by chance we don’t mention one of your favorites be sure to take a second to share your fall activity idea below so we can all add it to our list of possibilities. (more…)

Can I Get Your Number?

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Are you healthy? How do you know? What do you use to evaluate your level of health? In today’s culture, we have become health-obsessed. What IS healthy anyway?!

Size and shape, along with many other health indicators will vary from person to person depending on a thousand factors (age, family history, genetics, gender, etc). Health is certainly not one-size-fits-all. But, we can still utilize some tools to get a snap shot of your current health. Here are some basic health numbers that you should know. These numbers, all together, can give you a good idea of your overall health.

  1. Your blood pressure should be less than 130/80, but ideally it would be around 115/75.Blood Pressure: Your blood pressure should be less than 130/80, but ideally it would be around 115/75. High blood pressure puts you at risk for many complications including heart disease. The good news is that by being proactive, many people can avoid medication through diet and exercise. Make sure you know your current blood pressure and talk to your doctor about what is healthy for you.
  2. Cholesterol: This is tricky. There is ‘good’ cholesterol and ‘bad’ cholesterol and triglycerides. It is hard for a non-medically trained individual to keep track. That’s why we have doctors. Make sure this is being checked yearly (or more often if you are in the high risk zone). Basically though, you want your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol below 100 mg/dL and your HDL (“good”) cholesterol above 50 mg/dL.
  3. BMI: This is your Body Mass Index and it is a measure of your body fat based on your height vs. your weight. To calculate your BMI you can click here or Google “BMI calculator”. A BMI of 25-29.9 is considered over-weight, and BMI of 30 or more is considered obese. You want your BMI to fall into the 18.5-24.9 range. There are, of course, many more factors than height vs. weight to determine what is right for you, but this can be a good start.
  4. Waist circumference: Lately this measurement has been gaining popularity in the medical community. We have learned that more important than your weight is the distribution of your weight. If you carry your weight around your middle, you are at a higher risk than if you carry your weight in other areas. You want to measure your waist at its narrowest part. If you don’t have a noticeable narrowing or waist, you can measure across where your elbows fall with arms at your side. Your risk increases for many health conditions with a circumference of 40+ for men and 35+ for women. But perhaps the best way to calculate this is to compare your waist to your height. Your waist should be less than half your height. For example, I am 5’6” which is 65 inches. Half of 65 is 32.5. Therefore, my waist should be less than 32.5 inches at its narrowest point.
  5. Hours of sleep: Are you surprised to see this on my list? This is one indicator of good health that is too often ignored. Most people require 7-9 hours of consecutive sleep for optimal health. When we sleep, we heal, recover, and grow. People who get enough sleep have more energy, stronger immune systems, less pain, and weigh less than people that do not get enough sleep. Don’t brush off the importance of sleep. Watch less TV, leave the laundry for the weekend, and put the computer away (after you read my blog of course). If you are having trouble sleeping, ask your MD for suggestions.
  6. 1-10 Scale: Last, and certainly not least, is your personal score. How would you rank your health on a scale of 1-10? 10 would be ‘never been better, full of energy, bounce out of bed in the morning, happy/content’ and 1 would be ‘every day is a struggle, always sick, no energy, overweight, depressed, etc.’ If you were truly honest with yourself, what would your number be? Anything less than 8 should be unacceptable for you! This your one chance at life, so let’s enjoy every minute of it. I feel like Jerry McGuire – who’s coming with me???

If you are not where you want to be, don’t worry. This is not meant to make you feel bad; it is meant to empower you to take control of your health. Get a physical, get some good sleep, and get moving! Let’s all live the rest of 2013 in way that leaves no need to make resolutions in 2014.

Sources:
www.sleepfoundation.org
www.mayoclinic.org
www.heart.org

Taking Training Too Far: A Quick Look at Rhabdomyolysis

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First off, thanks for making it past the title and not assuming that rhabdomyolysis wasn’t some word I made up to sound like a medical genius. Rhabdomyolysis, or rhabdo in fitness slang, is a rare, but very dangerous condition seen in athletes that are pushing themselves too far. Fitness competitions are becoming a rapidly growing phenomenon, which means more and more people testing their body’s limits, so I figured it was time to raise some awareness about this condition and how to avoid it. (more…)

Three Ways to Avoid Knee Pain at the Gym

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Many patients come to physical therapy with knee pain as a result of gym workouts. Here are three ways to avoid knee pain while working out at the gym: (more…)

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