Tag Archive: pain

Skier’s Thumb

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Skier’s Thumb, Gamekeeper’s Thumb….. Baseball Player’s Thumb? Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Thumb:  An injury for all seasons. (more…)

Do knee braces or sleeves work for knee osteoarthritis?

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Knee osteoarthritis (breakdown of articular cartilage along the joint surfaces) is rampant in the aging population. Some statistics show nearly 1 in 2 people may develop symptomatic knee osteoarthritis by age 85 years (1). These are odds are not good! (more…)

Chronic Pain

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Pain, though far from enjoyable, is something every one of us will experience at some point in our life.   In many cases pain is acute and caused by some type of trauma, incident, surgery, disease, or illness and there’s an end in sight once the healing process occurs. Chronic pain however is a different animal as this type of pain persists sometimes days, weeks, months, or even years. In fact, you may be surprised to find out chronic pain affects more people than coronary heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined. Below is a chart from the American Academy of Pain Medicine which depicts this comparison.

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Adjusting Your Bicycle to Alleviate Pain

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Due to the repetitive nature of cycling, cyclists are at a higher risk for repetitive stress injuries. Some of these injuries may be caused by an improperly adjusted bicycle. When a bicycle is not ideally adjusted to fit you, you will experience higher levels of stress in certain areas of the body. This will eventually lead to tissue injury and pain. Think of it this way: if you were to use your finger to push on one small area of your skin 10 times, your body is able to adapt to that stress and there is no injury. If you were to push on that same area of your skin 1,000 times, you end up with a bruise, which indicates tissue injury. (more…)

Stretch of the Week: Calf Massage Technique

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This week we are going to give our calves a little extra love with a calf massage technique instead of a stretch. This is one I use all the time because my calves are so tight. If you have trigger points or “knots” in your muscles, this is a great way to work them out on your own. I’ll warn you right now, it might be tender, so just apply as much pressure as you feel comfortable. That’s the great thing about this technique, you have control over how much you sink into the tissue. (more…)

Video Gait Analysis: What All Runners Should Know

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Have you ever heard the term VGA or Video Gait Analysis mentioned by your physical therapist and wondered what he or she is talking about? A Video Gait Analysis involves recording your running gait, or stride, to determine symmetrical or atypical movement patterns. The video recording, a biomechanical exam and your physical therapist’s clinical assessment will provide you with a complete breakdown of your running mechanics. (more…)

How Physical Therapy Can Help Back Pain

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The back is designed to protect the spinal cord. However, it is also like a set of stackable blocks with bones that connect and run from the base of the head, to the bottom of our tailbone. Those stackable blocks keep us erect/upright, maintain posture, absorb shock and provide a stable base for our arms and legs to attach to for everyday movement.  There are three sections of the spine: (more…)

AC Sprain and How to Recover

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The shoulder is an important joint that is used throughout daily life. Once it becomes injured it can be very difficult to maintain a normal lifestyle. One joint effected by shoulder injury is the acromioclavicularjoint or more commonly referred to as the AC joint. (more…)

Debut Marathoner Series: 5 Tips for Recovering from Your First Marathon

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DebutMarathoner_graphic_0514

Congratulations, you have completed your very first marathon! Now what? Use the following recovery tips to help you feel your best in the days and weeks ahead. (more…)

Anxiety and Depression Associated with Physical Pain

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“Thats the thing about pain.  It demands to be felt.”- John Green

Early on in college, I decided in addition to majoring in physical therapy, I would also major in psychology.  Why?  I felt that if I was going to treat and understand the physical aspect of a person, I better understand a little bit about the brain, thoughts and emotion of an individual.  After all, each of us is not just a body or a brain.  We have both.  Why is it that it’s readily accepted as the “norm” if you mention you have knee arthritis or back pain, however, it becomes taboo to discuss the psychology or emotion that may be involved with that pain?  I firmly believe that the psychology of what one is experiencing is extremely important to discuss and address. (more…)

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