Athletico Health Resources

Tag: pain

Educate

Health & Wellness

Injury Prevention

Menu and Filters

Knee Pain- When to Seek a Professional

Posted on by Michelle Helberg

With fall sports underway, injuries are prone to happen.  With the cutting, twisting and tackling movements that occur in sports, such as football and soccer, Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries can occur. Read More

Jumper’s Knee

Posted on by Michelle Helberg

Everybody say “Jump Jump!” Have you ever experienced pain in the front of your knee after running or kicking? You probably have a condition called Jumper’s Knee or patellar tendonitis. Read More

Deep Sea Fishing: 7 Tips for Prevention of Low Back Pain

Posted on by Sarah Clough

Fish on! Hook up! Fresh one! These are all common phrases to yell out when your reel is screaming and the line is taken hundreds of feet into the ocean. It is also in that moment that you may realize your back is in for a workout. Read More

10 Tips for Fighting Foot Pain

Posted on by Lori Diamos

As humans, we are unique creatures for a couple of reasons – one for our ability to reason and two because we live life upright instead of on all fours. Living upright puts a pretty constant workload on our feet. Our feet can become painful or sensitive over time and foot pain is a common complaint in physical therapy. There are many basic strategies and self-treatments you can try if foot pain plagues you. Read More

No Pain, No Gain!?

Posted on by Sarah Clough

The theory of “no pain, no gain” is a popular saying and belief that I address in the physical therapy setting on a daily basis. Some people believe that in order to improve pain, strength, or flexibility, pain must be involved. Many attend therapy with the impression that physical therapy will hurt immensely and will nickname their soon-to-be physical therapist the “physical torturer”. Some come to their first session with fear and some come with the attitude of “hurt me so I can get better!” These are the individuals who are often surprised and/or relieved when I say that the goal is to relieve the pain, not to create it.  Of course, there are times when I have to create some pain to help a patient get better, but for the majority of patients, I am looking to find a way to increase mobility and strength without pushing through pain. Read More

5 Ways to Avoid Shoulder Impingement

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

With pitchers and catchers reporting for duty, people cramming in marathon gym sessions before spring break, and warm weather making people more active, I can guarantee the number of people seeing doctors, athletic trainers, and physical therapists for shoulder pain will soon rise. Luckily, one cause of shoulder pain, shoulder impingement, is often avoidable with some reasonable preventive strategies. Read More

One Sport Specialization May Increase Your Risk of a Knee Injury

Posted on by Dave Heidloff

In my last post on ACL injuries, I posted that overtraining can predispose someone to an ACL injury. Overtraining (spending too much time training without proper recovery) can have some serious health consequences. Overtraining is becoming an increasingly common problem as athletes are starting to specialize in one sport at younger ages. Discussing solutions to overtraining and specialization is always tough since it usually involves telling someone to play less of the sport they want to excel at. Having said that, research and anecdotal evidence both make a strong case for how varying up the sports you play through the year can lead to a healthier and more successful athletic career. Read More

Chronic Constipation & Getting You Going Again

Posted on by Stacy Koenigs

The old saying that “happiness is an empty bladder” easily could be adjusted to include that “happiness is a properly functioning bowel.”

Did you know that approximately 80 percent of the population experiences constipation at some point in their lifetime? Constipation is defined as difficulty (straining to pass) or infrequent bowel movements (fewer than 3 per week). Common symptoms of constipation include the need to strain to have a bowel movement, a sense of incomplete emptying, decrease in the amount of stool passed, and the need to use enemas, suppositories, or laxatives to aid in maintaining regularity. Read More

Page 3 of 512345
  • Subscribe to Receive Our Latest Articles

  • Categories

  • Featured Health Resource

  • Athletico on Twitter