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Why New Moms Need Physical Therapy

Posted on by Tara Selvy, PT, DPT

The wait is finally over; after nine months of doctor appointments and nursery decorating, your baby has arrived! Keep in mind, that it’s still an ongoing process after giving birth, and along the journey of pregnancy, your body has encountered many changes. You may find it difficult to return to your prior activity levels or experience new problems related to your pelvic floor. This blog will discuss how new moms can benefit from physical therapy to address any concerns after having their baby.

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Physical Therapy for Every Stage of Pregnancy

Posted on by Christina Christie PT, CCE, FAFS, 3DMAPS, CAFS

Pregnancy, labor and delivery, recovery and motherhood are athletic events in themselves! And while women are extremely resilient, many may find great benefits through physical therapy. Physical Therapists who specialize in Pelvic Health can assist your journey at every stage of pregnancy, as well as in the recovery stage throughout the fourth trimester.

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How Much Is Too Much? What You Need to Know About Urinary Frequency

Posted on by Ariel Wynne, PT, DPT

How much is too much? This is the question hidden in my patients’ jokes about having “the smallest bladder on earth” or comments that they wake up frequently at night “but that’s just part of aging.” These patients often feel like their bladder runs the show and they have little to no control over how often they go to the bathroom. It interferes with sleep, work, exercise, and even social activities.

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Returning to Exercise Postpartum

Posted on by Dawn Klos, ASTYM cert

After giving birth, a lot of questions arise on how to return to a workout program safely once cleared by your doctor. Every birth is different (vaginal delivery vs caesarian section), so it’s important to discuss with your doctor before returning to exercise. Typically, walking and gentle exercises are permitted immediately after birth, but most doctors do not clear women for impact activities until at least 6 weeks postpartum. Certain women’s recoveries will be longer, and it is important to ease into abdominal strengthening. Starting a vigorous workout too early can cause problems such as incontinence or prolapse of the pelvic floor (when organs in the pelvis slip down from their normal position).

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Four Things to Know about Tummy Time

Posted on by Malvika Sampath, PT, DPT

There is so much for new parents to know, including concerns as parents bring home their new baby. A huge need for babies is tummy time. As a physical therapist, I recommend to my parent patients that they should attempt to perform a few minutes of tummy time every awake period. This allows for the baby to avoid constantly laying on their back after and right before a nap. Below are four things you should know about tummy time:

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Answers to Embarrassing Pelvic Health Questions

Posted on by Margaret Steck, MPT

Dysfunction in the muscles of the pelvic floor cause a variety of problems and are actually quite common. Certain physical therapists are trained in treating pelvic health and are ready to help! Here is a list of some of the questions that may seem embarrassing to talk about if you think you’re experiencing pelvic-related problems.

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Exercises to Strengthen Your Pelvic Floor

Posted on by Athletico

The pelvic floor, also known as the “hammock” of your core, is very important to keep strong and mobile. It provides support for the pelvic organs, including the bladder, uterus and rectum in the female pelvis. In the male pelvis, the pelvic floor supports the bladder and rectum.

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Preventing Wrist Pain When Nursing

Posted on by Shelia M. Tenny, OTR/L, CHT

After the mental and physical changes brought on by pregnancy, the last thing that a new mother wants to experience is pain in her wrists and hands from nursing or feeding her newborn baby. Getting an infant to latch on can be hard enough under normal conditions, and yet the feeling of “pins and needles” or wrist pain, can makes things even more difficult.

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